Sunday, 24 January 2016

How to fix: The In-row data RSVD page count for object ‘SchemaName.ObjectName’, index ID ‘x’, partition ID ‘xxxxxxxxxxxxxx’

Undoubtedly, we all know that SQL Server 2000 is now out of compliance with Microsoft. Surprisingly, not all companies have their databases migrated, so in that sense, many of them are planning to upgrade to one of the latest version of SQL Server (SQL Server 2014/2016). This post pretends to give a recommendation that you may take it as a good practice in order to avoid inconsistency errors of object metadata for the upgraded databases. The inconsistency errors what I am talking about can be found when you run DBCC CHECKDB command to check the logical and physical integrity:
DBCC CHECKDB(N'MyDatabase') WITH NO_INFOMSGS

And here the following inconsistency error is likely to appear:
The In-row data RSVD page count for object ‘SchemaName.ObjectName’, index ID 0, partition ID 75863107960832, alloc unit ID 75863107960832 (type In-row data) is incorrect.

Run DBCC UPDATEUSAGE.

CHECKDB found 0 allocation errors and 1 consistency errors in table ‘SchemaName.ObjectName’ (object ID 1157579162). CHECKDB found 0 allocation errors and 1 consistency errors in database ‘MyDatabase’.
The output message above tells us that there is one LOGICAL consistency error inside the database "MyDatabase" because there are pages and row count inaccuracies for the table which ID is 1157579162. Luckily, errors of this sort can be fixed by running DBCC UPDATEUSAGE command which reports and corrects the inaccuracies. Only after successfully running DBCC UPDATEUSAGE(0) command in the database context will you be able to see the following messages indicating we got all inaccuracies fixed.
DBCC UPDATEUSAGE: Usage counts updated for table 'SchemaName.ObjectName' (index 'ObjectName' , partition 1):

        RSVD pages (In-row Data): changed from (-275) to (145) pages.

DBCC execution completed. If DBCC printed error messages, contact your system administrator.

Finally, we are now able to run again DBCC CHECKDB without any error. The recommendation is that so rapidly have you upgraded your databases (from SQL Server 2000 to superior version) that you must execute DBCC UPDATEUSAGE so as to avoid those errors (or more critical issues). Thanks for reading!

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